Photo 19 Apr 25 notes humanoidhistory:

THE BRICK MOON — Illustration from the 1869 science fiction story “The Brick Moon" by Edward Everett Hale, published serially in The Atlantic Monthly. The speculative tale describes the construction and launch of a 200-foot-diameter sphere made of bricks — but, of course, 37 people are accidentally on board. Placed in polar orbit for sailors to use as a navigational aid, the satellite’s stranded inhabitants communicate with Earth in morse code by jumping up and down on the outside of the all-brick sphere. The story is the first known fictional depiction of a space station. (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

THE BRICK MOON — Illustration from the 1869 science fiction story “The Brick Moon" by Edward Everett Hale, published serially in The Atlantic Monthly. The speculative tale describes the construction and launch of a 200-foot-diameter sphere made of bricks — but, of course, 37 people are accidentally on board. Placed in polar orbit for sailors to use as a navigational aid, the satellite’s stranded inhabitants communicate with Earth in morse code by jumping up and down on the outside of the all-brick sphere. The story is the first known fictional depiction of a space station. (NASA)

Photo 18 Apr 1,397 notes nevver:

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Photo 18 Apr 29,143 notes skipxd:

slide to unlock

skipxd:

slide to unlock

via Unbuttons.
Photo 18 Apr 382 notes explore-blog:

Kurt Vonnegut's 1999 commencement address
Video 18 Apr 225 notes

bobbycaputo:

Epic Photos Expose Mankind’s Uneasy Relationship With Water

Edward Burtynsky’s work can be seen as a 30-year-long meditation on the prime forces that shape our modern world. Through projects like Oil, Quarries, and Manufactured Landscapes, he’s developed a singular approach to presenting stop-you-in-your-tracks images of the staggering impact of human activity.

Burtynsky and his team are true to form in Water, a jaw-dropping survey in photos and film of the most essential substance to life on Earth.

“There are alternatives to oil,” he says. “There’s electricity in solar and wind, and electric cars. We can begin to do workarounds, albeit not rapidly, but over time we can work around and find alternative energy. But there is no alternative to water. It’s either there or it’s not.”

(Continue Reading)

Video 18 Apr 203 notes

kateoplis:

Good is dead.

Still a holiday though so I guess there’s that

via kateoplis.
Video 16 Apr 1,271 notes
Video 16 Apr 914 notes

kateoplis:

Serious gorgeousness: Rijksmuseum Revisited

via kateoplis.
Video 16 Apr 1,297 notes

the-paintrist:

decadentiacoprofaga:

Postcards by Franz Marc, 1913. Source.

Two Foxes – to Albert Bloch in Munich, 4 February 1913
Two Sheep, to Wassily Kandinsky in Murnau, 1 May 1913.
Two Lying Black Cats, to Erich Heckel without date and postmark.
The Tower of Blue Horses, to Else Lasker-Schüler in Berlin, end of December 1912/early January 1913.
Black Cow Behind a Tree, postcard written by Maria Marc (Franz Marc’ wife) from Sindelsdorf to Elisabeth Macke (August Macke’s wife) in Bonn, 21 May 1913.
Three Horses in Landscape with Houses, to Paul Klee in Munich, 8 November 1913.
Two Cats, to Lily Klee in Munich, 6 March 1913.
Four Foxes, to Wassily Kandinsky in Munich, 4 February 1913.

Franz Marc (February 8, 1880 – March 4, 1916) was a German painter and printmaker, one of the key figures of the German Expressionist movement. He was a founding member of Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), a journal whose name later became synonymous with the circle of artists collaborating in it.

Photo 16 Apr 47 notes expressionismus:

Erich Heckel - Krummer Kanal, 1915

expressionismus:

Erich Heckel - Krummer Kanal, 1915


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